Partitioning, Mount Points and other Gems in Ubuntu 7.10

Power Cuts

Two days ago we had several power cuts that completely managed to scrag my hard drives in logan and cerebro (the Fileserver), Ho hum… Time for a re-install, I guess. Good job the data on the file server was on a separate hard drive. Having done some research since the first install, now might be the time to add some security to the systems by utilizing several partitions to protect the data. The idea being that if the system goes down I can work on that and configuration as well as user data remains safe.

Partitions? Why bother?

When Ubuntu installs, it sets itself up in one large partition and up to this point I have used the Guided – Use Entire Disk option. So why use separate partitions for some of the installation? Well, I figure there are several advantages. It goes like this:

Partition Use

/ The root (/) partition stores the core system files and apart from some small additions and re-compiles will remain relatively fixed. Being separate from everything else should give it extra security.

/usr This directory holds user tools, compilers and other stuff. This will surely grow as I add stuff and being separate will allow easier and more secure re-installs.

/var This directory holds the log files, spool files and other stuff that changes a lot. Giving it a partition all to itself, it means that a runaway system generating loads of data will fill this small partition up rather than taking over the whole system. There is a type of system attack that generates millions of log entries with the aim of toileting free space so a separate storage space for these files seems a really good idea.

/tmp Temporary files could also possibly grow beyond belief, so that same logic applies here.

/home
Placing the home directories on their own partition prevents users from filling up the hard drive and enforces a primitive form of quota management. This will have to do until I can figure out how to get home directories on the server.

The Plan

Logan has a 250 Gb hard drive and that gives 236 Gb to Linux. During the installation process, I choose Manual rather than either of the Guided partitioning systems. The first step is to delete the suggested partitions before setting up my own plan.

/ 25 Gb
swap 3 Gb
/usr 50 Gb
/home 50 Gb
/var 50 Gb
/tmp 72 Gb

On reflection I might change the home directory to 72Gb and reduce /tmp to 50Gb.

Mount Points

As you set the size of a partition (25000 for 25 Gb, for example) the dialog asks for a mount point and doesn’t offer me any choices. A Mount Point is a directory in the file system where the new partition is going to live, so all I’ve got to do here is type in the directory names listed above for each partition.

All have been set up and I click the go button, the rest of the system install flawlessly. Brilliant!

Powered by ScribeFire.

About these ads

6 thoughts on “Partitioning, Mount Points and other Gems in Ubuntu 7.10

  1. David A Smith says:

    This helped a lot! I just did not understand the Ubuntu instructions and deleting and recreating the partitions worked. Thanks, DAS<

  2. abdulla says:

    Very Good

  3. onceanewbie says:

    your partitioning will _work_, but be utterly inefficient. imagine that a full-blown install of any linux won’t require more than 5-15GB. so you will get more usable space for /home if you give 5GB to each /var and /usr, 8GB to /tmp, 1-2x the size of your system’s RAM to swap, 1GB to / (root), and the rest to /home.
    A separate /boot partition of 128MB is always a reasonable choice, too.
    always keep on trying to master linux! it’s worth it, and once you’re done you’ll be assigned another task :-)

  4. onceiwasan00b says:

    your partitioning will _work_, but be utterly inefficient. imagine that a full-blown install of any linux won’t require more than 5-15GB. so you will get more usable space for /home if you give 5GB to each /var and /usr, 8GB to /tmp, 1-2x the size of your system’s RAM to swap, 1GB to / (root), and the rest to /home.
    A separate /boot partition of 128MB is always a reasonable choice, too.
    always keep on trying to master linux! it’s worth it, and once you’re done you’ll be assigned another task :-)

  5. […] Partitioning, Mount Points and other Gems in Ubuntu 7.10 « Sylvarwolf Linux Blog gives quantitative breakdown of how to ration the partitions (tags: partition howto ubuntu) […]

  6. […] Partitioning, Mount Points and other Gems in Ubuntu 7.10 …Nov 25, 2007 … Partitioning, Mount Points and other Gems in Ubuntu 7.10. Power Cuts. Two days ago we had several power cuts that completely managed to … […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s